Deep Freezer Resumes

January 31, 2007

In my opinion, it is the goal of all inanimate objects to seek out and overcome mankind. One such illustration of this condition is that of the otherwise very savvy technical individual in the pursuit of IT employment. As if a database or spider will treat him/her any differently than someone, well, not so technical, but nonetheless looking for employment and who happens to follow an antiquated (or not) notion of putting a location reference (notice I said reference not preference) in their contact information, an employment GPS if you will.

Here is the trend as I see it: contractors, consultants and those seeking full time employment in any geographical area decide it is best to omit where they are currently residing with the intent to indicate location is not important, they will go wherever there is a good employment opportunity. Okay, so you are trying to tell me something by not telling me something. I am experiencing this as: true and true equal false. That’s not what you want, is it?

Most human and non human search efforts do one thing in common when trying to fill a position –they look to the local populace in the area of the opportunity, first, always. That means if you live in Boring, OR and I search for people living in Boring, OR with Agile and x, y, z skills and you do not have any GPS info on your resume (minimum city and state), you will not show up on my return results, even if you live next door to the employer and have every key technical search word on your resume I ever dreamed of. Your resume will not be detected in any form for me nor produce any results for you. End of story. You may show up in a subsequent search after I have evaluated candidates in the first search, if I decide to release the geographic parameters, but that’s a lot of “when and ifs” and may not be until the next day or later or never…
Therefore, for a majority of IT professionals who think the lack of geographic location information is opening more windows (sorry for using the term) of opportunity for employment, you are sadly mistaken.
In reality, you are losing time and opportunities.

A search engine or human powered effort over the internet does what it logically should do: find the words or phrases desired. If you live in Kissimmee, FL and Boring, OR is an acceptable location, you must find a way to tell me other than not telling me where you are located. Select as many multiple location options as possible over omitting location when applying to a position online. Include verbiage that mentions Southern California as a potential desired location if that is what you desire. Or Southern California and Oregon locations would be considered. My point is: include the words and proper desired location options carefully and give more rather than less information in the effort to secure the best possible opportunity.
Think about it. You know what happens when a search command criteria isn’t met – deep freeze. I don’t want inanimate objects to win. I want “us” to win.

Crystal Richardson
Agile Talent Specialist

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One Response to “Deep Freezer Resumes”

  1. Laszlo Says:

    CR,
    Thanks for the post. IMHO, in the world of identity fraud, leaving out my complete address on a resume would be the best.

    I advise people who are looking for work to list CITY and STATE they are in, but not the address. If you must, get a PO BOX.

    E.G.

    Joe Smith
    Scrum Master and General Agile /J2EE Guru
    PO BOX 123
    Mountain View, CA

    I agree with you though, posting where you want to go in a resume is usually helpful. I know I’ve come across folks who are interested in both Washington, DC and Washington State. But when I call ’em they really want one or the other and they go off on me, so…

    keep in Agile,
    Laszlo


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